Channel Landforms

Channel

Channel Landforms Have 3 Main Characteristics:

  1. A waterway between 2 land masses
  2. Connects 2 bodies of water
  3. Permits boat traffic or larger vessels

Example of a Channel Landform:
The channel picture or map is of the English Channel, UK

What is a Channel Landform?

A channel is a waterway that lies between 2 landmasses, connecting 2 bodies of water.
A channel has sufficient width and depth for boats or larger vessels to pass. A channel can also be a specific route through a body of water to guarantee sufficient depth for passing vessels.




How are Channels Formed?

Various geological process can help to create a channel. A change in water level can sometimes create or remove a water channel, depending on land conditions above and below the water. A channel can be artificially built to connect two bodies of water.

As a route through a body of water for passing vessels, a channel can be created or maintained by removing material from the bottom of the route for passage.

Where Can a Channel Be Found?

A channel can be found on any body of water between land masses where there is enough room for boat traffic.

How large is a Channel?

A channel can be large enough for small boats to pass, or many miles across, permitting ocean going vessels to pass safely.

Famous Channels

 Ambrose Channel, New York City, USA
 The English Channel, UK
 Strait of Gibraltar

The Ambrose Channel is the main shipping channel that leads into New York Harbor. It is a route through the water whose depth is maintained so that vessels can enter safely. The English Channel separates the United Kingdom from the coast of France and mainland Europe.

It begins at the Atlantic Ocean and passes eastward, south of the English Coast. At the east end it narrows at Dover’s Strait and then opens toward the North Sea. The channel is 350 miles long and 150 miles wide at its widest point. At Dover’s Strait, it narrows to only 20 miles in width.

The word “strait” also means a waterway between two land masses. The strait of Gibraltar is a channel that connects the Mediterranean Sea to the Atlantic Ocean between the southern tip of Spain and Morocco in northern Africa. The strait is only 7.7 miles wide and was a strategic location during wartime, controlling passage in and out of the Mediterranean Sea.

Channel definition:

A waterway that passes between two land masses, connecting two bodies of water and permitting the passage of boats or larger vessels

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