Pyramidal Peak Landforms


Pyramidal Peak Landforms Have 2 Main Characteristics:

  1. Where two or more arêtes meet
  2. Peak formation, somewhat like a pyramid

Example of a Pyramidal Peak Landform:
The pyramidal peak picture above is of Matterhorn, border of Switzerland and Italy

What is a Pyramidal Peak Landform?

A pyramidal peak is the meeting point of two or more arêtes in the form of a mountain peak.

How are Pyramidal Peaks Formed?

Glacier movements may form an arête, a sharp ridge that can form between two glacier flows. Where two or more arêtes meet, this can be in the form of a peak that may look somewhat like a pyramid.

How Large is a Pyramidal Peak?

A pyramidal peak can be a small peak on a mountain ridge, or a large mountain peak formed by glacier activity. A large pyramidal peak is sometimes called a horn.

Where Can a Pyramidal Peak Be Found?

A pyramidal peak can be found in mountainous areas that were carved by glacial activity.

Famous Pyramidal Peaks

• Matterhorn, border of Switzerland and Italy
• Kitzsteinhorn, Austria
• Grand Teton, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
• Mount Assiniboine, Canada

The Matterhorn is perhaps the most famous mountain of the Swiss Alps. While some climbers have successfully reached the summit, over 500 people have died making the attempt since 1865. The Kitzsteinhorn peak in Austria is a tourist destination that is also famous for a tragedy that occurred in November, 2000 where 155 people died when a train caught fire as it ascended through a tunnel.

Grand Teton is a large mountain with a pyramidal peak in the Grand Teton National Park of northwest Wyoming. At over 13,000 feet, it is the highest in the Grand Teton Mountain Range, a part of the Rocky Mountains. Mount Assiniboine is part of the Great Divide on the border of British Columbia and Alberta, Canada. As the highest mountain peak in the southern Canadian Rockies at almost 12,000 feet, it is sometimes called the “Matterhorn of the Rockies” because of its similar appearance.

Pyramidal Peak definition:

Where two or more arêtes meet to form a peak which may appear somewhat like a pyramid.

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