Geyser Landforms


Geyser Landforms Have 3 Main Characteristics:

  1. A narrow opening in the ground
  2. Emits water and steam intermittently
  3. Found in areas of geothermal activity

Example of a Geyser Landform:

The geyser picture is of Old Faithful, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

What is a Geyser Landform?

A geyser is an opening in the ground that occasionally or regularly discharges water and steam.

How are Geysers Formed?

When ground water enters an area of geothermal activity below the ground, this can produce steam. The pressure generated from steam can force groundwater to the surface. If an narrow opening is available, water and steam may be ejected. When all the water has turned to steam, the pressure drops and the eruption stops.

How Large is a Geyser?

Geysers are usually measured by the height of an eruption. Most famous geysers reach at least 100 feet high during a major eruption. The highest recently active geysers can reach over 300 feet. The highest known geyser in history was Waimangu Geyser of New Zealand which erupted from 1900 to 1904. The tallest eruptions of Waimangu were estimated at over 1500 feet in height.

Where Can a Geyser Be Found?

Over one thousand active geysers can be found in the world. They occur in areas of volcanic activity that have pockets of magma deep underground, often near a fault line. The single most active area for geysers is Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. It has an average of 465 active geysers each year.

Famous Geysers

• Strokkur, Iceland
• Old Faithful, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA
• Grand Geyser of Yellowstone
• Great Geysir, Iceland
• Steamboat Geyser of Yellowstone

Strokkur is a geyser in Iceland that erupts every few minutes. Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park is the most famous geyser in the US, which erupts regularly every 65 to 90 minutes and reaches up to 185 feet in height. The tallest predictable geyser in the world is Grand Geyser, also in Yellowstone, which erupts for up to 10 minutes twice daily reaching up to 200 feet.

Great Geysir or Geysir of Iceland has been considered to be the world’s tallest geyser in recent years. In the year 2000 after an earthquake it erupted several times to almost 400 feet in height. However, some say that Geysir is now dormant. Although Steamboat Geyser in Yellowstone National Park erupts only occasionally with intervals of up to 50 years, there were 2 recent major eruptions in 2013 and 2014 that were more than 300 feet high.

Geyser definition:

A narrow opening in the ground that ejects hot water and steam intermittently

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